Past Events

Three Minute Thesis (3MT) Finals at UVA

Wed, 04/18/2018 - 15:00
Harrison-Small

Three Minute Thesis (3MT) at UVA

  
 
Whether you're networking, interviewing for a job, or just having a conversation at a party, it is essential to have an "elevator pitch" to describe your dissertation work. Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an exercise that helps graduate students develop the necessary communication skills to effectively explain their scholarship in a clear and succinct way so that all people, from field-specialist to the lay-person, can understand the topic and importance of their work. Plus, it comes with the opportunity to win prizes! Learn more and enter by clicking right here!

 

Three Minute Thesis (3MT) at UVA

Wed, 04/18/2018 - 15:00
Harrison-Small

Three Minute Thesis (3MT) at UVA

  
 
Whether you're networking, interviewing for a job, or just having a conversation at a party, it is essential to have an "elevator pitch" to describe your dissertation work. Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an exercise that helps graduate students develop the necessary communication skills to effectively explain their scholarship in a clear and succinct way so that all people, from field-specialist to the lay-person, can understand the topic and importance of their work. Plus, it comes with the opportunity to win prizes! Learn more and enter by clicking right here!

 

2018 Huskey Graduate Research Exhibition

Tue, 03/20/2018 - 13:00
Checkin Outside Newcomb Ballroom

Save the date! The 2018 Huskey Graduate Research Exhibition will take place the afternoon of Tuesday, March 20th 2018 in Newcomb Hall
Graduate Students: Submit an Abstract Application before the Feb 01 Deadline!
Faculty and Research Staff: Volunteer to Judge

Dr. Robert J. Huskey, professor of Biology, served the University of Virginia for 32 years. As Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, Dr. Huskey sought to improve the graduate student experience, in particular by developing assistantships and providing affordable health care. To honor Dr. Huskey's commitment to graduate students, in 2001 the Graduate Student Council introduced the Huskey Graduate Research Exhibition. This upcoming exhibition will mark the 18th annual opportunity for graduate students to present their innovative research with the University of Virginia community.
The exhibition is intended for a general audience. High-scoring presentations will effectively 1) set up the question being investigated; 2) frame the question in context of its broader importance; 3) communicate an evidence-based argument; 4) be accessible to an audience of diverse educational backgrounds. 
Eligibility: Graduate students within the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences are able to apply.
Oral presentation (10-12 minutes) slots are limited. There will be three separate sessions available:

Natural Sciences

Social Sciences

Arts & Humanities
Poster presentations (deliverable in 4-5 minutes) should be targeted towards a general audience.
Schedule of Events:
1-1:30pm: Oral Presenter & Judge Check-in (Outside Newcomb Ballroom)
1:30-3:30pm: Oral Presentations (Multiple Rooms, Newcomb Hall)
3:15-3:45pm: Poster Presenter & Judge Check-in (Outside Newcomb Ballroom)
3:45-4:45pm: Poster Presentations (Newcomb Ballroom)
5-5:30pm: Keynote Address, President Teresa A. Sullivan (South Meeting Room)
6-7:30pm: Wine & Cheese Reception/Awards Ceremony (Colonnade Club)

Presidential Fellows in Data Science 2018-2019 Program

Mon, 03/19/2018 - 09:30

Program Description 
The Presidential Fellowships in Data Science are designed to facilitate deep collaborations between students from diverse areas who have defined a problem, or problem area that is related to Big Data, and/or Data Science, and that requires the application of their collective, diverse knowledge and expertise.  Ideally, projects supported through the program address large, complex problems with significant social impact, while advancing the individual research work of each fellow in a significant way.  Examples of current and past projects supported through the program can be seen here:  https://dsi.virginia.edu/projects/presidential-fellows
Prospective Presidential Fellows are ideally students in the research phase, whose dissertation work or final projects will benefit from deep collaboration with a student and faculty advisor from another discipline (e.g., science and humanities; engineering and education; social science and nursing; etc.).  Prospective fellows should work closely with one another in the development of a project proposal that draws upon and enhances the research of each individual student, while also contributing to the larger project. 
In addition to the funding provided by the fellowship (details below), each cohort of fellows will be expected to participate in a series of workshops, presentations, and training experiences related to collaboration, presenting research to diverse audiences, and interdisciplinary publishing.  Learning how to collaborate across broad disciplinary boundaries is a primary goal of the program, and students should be committed to engaging in activities that support this goal.  

Fellowship Details

Eligibility:
Students must be enrolled full time in a graduate or professional program during the 2018-2019 academic year.  All students may apply, but preference will be given to students who are advanced enough in their programs to focus on a specific research project.  Fellowship recipients are expected to refrain from all other teaching/research appointments over the course of the fellowship period. 
Each fellowship provides the following:

12-month stipend of $30,000.  Fellowships may begin in June 2018 (stipend distributed over 12 months) or September 2018 (stipend distributed over 9 months)

Tuition and fees of up to $11,000 total (summer tuition not included)

Graduate student health insurance subsidy (single coverage)

Proposal Details and Submission Process
Proposal submission will occur through the InfoReady internal proposal system https://virginia.infoready4.com/#manageCompetitionsDetail/1767857
Each team of applicants should submit a single project proposal containing the following elements:

One research plan, no longer than three pages, single spaced (Times New Roman 12-point font, standard 1" margins), that includes a description of the overarching problem and its significance, and the methods and approach(es) that will be used to address it.

A two-page C.V. or bio-sketch for each graduate student and for each graduate student's advisor.

UVA transcripts for each graduate student (transcripts may be unofficial, printed from SIS).

A half-page, single-spaced statement (Times New Roman 12-point font, standard 1" margins) from each student on how the project will enhance her/his research and career objectives.

A one-page (maximum) statement from each student's adviser that addresses her/his student's fit for the project, including the student's research qualifications, and evidence of her/his professionalism, and collaborative spirit.

A one-page (maximum) statement from each of the student's adviser that details how the advisor will support the project, especially with his/her own time and attention, attendance at student presentations, etc.
Review Criteria:
All projects are reviewed by an interdisciplinary panel of faculty and judged on the following primary criteria: 

Clarity:  Is the project understandable to a general academic audience?  Is the statement of the problem, the rationale for addressing it, the methods to be employed, and expected results clearly articulated?  

Relevance:  Does the proposal identify a significant problem, with high social relevance or implications, that demands or uses significant amounts of data, or new approaches to data, to resolve? 

Impact potential:  Does the project have the potential to shed significant new light on an area of inquiry, or to change the way research and scholarship in an area or field is approached? Does the project have the potential to make a significant contribution to society?

Innovation and novelty:  Is the approach to the research novel, and innovative?  Does it address a problem in new ways?  Why/how is it different than research that has already been/is already being conducted in this topical area?

Team composition:  Are the members of the team sufficiently prepared to engage in the project?  Does the proposed research necessitate the expertise of each member of the group in a significant way?  Are the students’ advisors sufficiently invested in the work and prepared to support all of the students on the project team?
Timeline: 
Final proposals must be submitted to the Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs no later than Monday, March 19 with awards announced no later than April 1. 
 
Contacts:
Beth Beal, Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs Programs Administrator, 243.4014, BethBeal@virginia.edu
Phil Trella, Asst. VP for Graduate and Postdoctoral Affairs, 243.2018, trella@virginia.edu

Bringing Linguistics to Work

Fri, 03/16/2018 - 13:00
Brooks Hall Commons

Bringing Linguistics to Work
Friday, March 16, 1-3pm
Brooks Hall Commons
 
The world of work needs critical thinkers who deal in abstractions and ambiguity. It needs cross-cultural competency and lack of prescriptivism, flexibility and adaptability, and readiness to embrace change and complexity. Perhaps more than anything, the world of work needs people who are trained to think in systems – people who see puzzles and can find the underlying patterns and processes that structure visible and apparently chaotic surface representations in any domain. Participants in this workshop will be given the tools to bring a linguistic perspective to the texts and interactions that structure their job search. They will hear about people who are bringing linguistics to work in non-academic settings. And they will learn how to attend to the language they use in their professional self-presentation in resumes, cover letters, job interviews, and networking interactions.

About the speaker:

Anna Marie Trester is an interactional sociolinguist. She has worked as a trainer at the FrameWorks Institute, a social change communications firm, and served as director of the Language and Communication MA program at Georgetown University. She is committed to helping linguists expand their professional options and helping the "world of work" appreciate how much language experts have to contribute. She has published in venues such as Text and Talk, Language and Society, and The Journal of Sociolinguistics. She is co-editor (with Deborah Tannen) of Discourse 2.0: Language and New Media (2013) and author of Bringing Linguistics to Work (2017). She received her MA in linguistics from NYU in 2002 and her PhD from Georgetown in 2008.

Charlottesville Women in Data Science (WiDS) Conference

Fri, 03/16/2018 - 09:30
Harrison-Small Auditorium

Event Details
The 2018 Charlottesville Women in Data Science (WiDS) Conference, to be held on Friday, March 16, aims to inspire and educate data scientists worldwide, regardless of gender, and support women in the field. Hosted by the UVA Data Science Institute, this year’s event will feature a keynote presentation by Red Hat Vice President of Enterprise Data & Analytics Heidi Lanford, roundtable lunches led by leading women in the field, and skills sessions in R and machine learning.
WiDS Charlottesville is a regional event affiliated with the Global Women in Data Science (WiDS) Conference which will be held March 5, 2018 at Stanford University. All genders are invited to participate in the conference, which features exclusively female speakers.
Click here to register
This event aims to galvanize and cultivate our regional data science community, and to support women who are and who want to become leaders in the field of data science.
All genders are invited to participate! We look forward to welcoming a diverse audience to the conference, which will feature a keynote presentation by Red Hat Vice President of Enterprise Data & Analytics Heidi Lanford, roundtable lunches led by leading women in the field, and skills sessions in R and machine learning.
 See the full agenda

Preliminary Presentation 3: Three Minute Thesis (3MT) at UVA

Thu, 03/01/2018 - 10:00
OpenGrounds, Studio B

Preliminary Presentation 3: Three Minute Thesis (3MT) at UVA

  
 
Whether you're networking, interviewing for a job, or just having a conversation at a party, it is essential to have an "elevator pitch" to describe your dissertation work. Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an exercise that helps graduate students develop the necessary communication skills to effectively explain their scholarship in a clear and succinct way so that all people, from field-specialist to the lay-person, can understand the topic and importance of their work. Plus, it comes with the opportunity to win prizes!
Learn more and enter by clicking right here!

 

Preliminary Presentation 2: Three Minute Thesis (3MT) at UVA

Wed, 02/28/2018 - 13:00
OpenGrounds, Studio B

Preliminary Presentation 2: Three Minute Thesis (3MT) at UVA

  
 
Whether you're networking, interviewing for a job, or just having a conversation at a party, it is essential to have an "elevator pitch" to describe your dissertation work. Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an exercise that helps graduate students develop the necessary communication skills to effectively explain their scholarship in a clear and succinct way so that all people, from field-specialist to the lay-person, can understand the topic and importance of their work. Plus, it comes with the opportunity to win prizes!
Learn more and enter by clicking right here!

 

Preliminary Presentation 1: Three Minute Thesis (3MT) at UVA

Tue, 02/27/2018 - 10:00
OpenGrounds, Studio B

Preliminary Presentation 1: Three Minute Thesis (3MT) at UVA

  
 
Whether you're networking, interviewing for a job, or just having a conversation at a party, it is essential to have an "elevator pitch" to describe your dissertation work. Three Minute Thesis (3MT) is an exercise that helps graduate students develop the necessary communication skills to effectively explain their scholarship in a clear and succinct way so that all people, from field-specialist to the lay-person, can understand the topic and importance of their work. Plus, it comes with the opportunity to win prizes!
Learn more and enter by clicking right here!

 

Beyond Academia: 5 Steps to Your Nonacademic Job Search

Fri, 02/23/2018 - 12:00
Online

Graduate students and postdocs receive a wealth of information and mentorship on securing an academic position. But what about when you decide to pursue professional options in industry, nonprofit, or government? This workshop by Fatimah Williams, Ph.D., (Col ’02) shares popular nonacademic careers for PhDs, and provides a 5 step framework for launching an effective job search.
Register right here.

Fatimah Williams, Ph.D., Col '02

Presenter Bio:
Fatimah Williams, Ph.D., Col ’02, is a speaker, author, and career coach whose professional development guidance has been featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Education, Scientific American, University Affairs, numerous podcasts, and her book Be Bold: Launch Your Job Search or Career Change with Confidence.  She founded Beyond the Tenure Track to equip graduate students and PhDs to explore and prepare for diverse professional opportunities.
Dr. Williams holds a doctorate in Cultural Anthropology from Rutgers University and bachelor’s degrees in Foreign Affairs and African American Studies from the University of Virginia. Awarded the nationally competitive Consortium for Faculty Diversity Postdoctoral Fellowship, Dr. Williams also serves as chair of the Workshops Committee of the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology and is a member of the Graduate Career Consortium and the National Postdoctoral Association. Additionally, she is a former Associate Director of Graduate Student and Postdoctoral Scholar Advising at the University of Pennsylvania Career Services.
Contact Dr. Williams at fatimah@beyondthetenuretrack.com.

#METOO: Lessons for Higher Education

Tue, 02/20/2018 - 19:00
Kaleidoscope Room, Newcomb Hall

Since the #MeToo movement gained traction in October, waves of allegations of sexual harassment have rocked workplaces across an array of industries. As one professional community after another has been called to account, we need to take the time for a careful look at how college campuses are affected by the issues this movement raises. Register or learn more information right here.
Our panelists include:
MEREDITH CLARK
Meredith D. Clark is an Assistant Professor of the Media Studies Department. She is a former newspaper journalist whose research focuses on the intersections of race, media, and power.
ANNE COUGHLIN
Anne M. Coughlin is the Lewis F. Powell, Jr., Professor of Law. Her primary research and teaching interests are in the areas of criminal law..., criminal procedure, feminist jurisprudence, and law and humanities.
CATHERINE SPEAR
Catherine Spear is the Associate Vice President of the Office for Equal Opportunity and Civil Rights at the University of Virginia. She is charged with the primary responsibility for implementing all of the programs, policies, procedures, and initiatives of EOCR.
LISA SPEIDEL
Lisa Speidel is an Assistant Professor of the Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Her work and research focuses on examining the role of masculinity, healthy sexuality, gender based violence, and the intersection of racism and other forms of systemic oppression.
Please join us for a conversation about ways that we can ensure a respectful climate, support those who have experienced sexual harassment, and encourage allies to play an active role.

UVA Suit Up

Sun, 02/11/2018 - 18:30
JCPenney @ Fashion Square Mall

UVA Suit Up
Sun, Feb 11th
6:30 - 9:00pm
JCPenney @ Fashion Square MallUVA Shuttle Available
Don't miss this private event for UVA students to take advantage of an extra 40% off discount (in addition to existing sales) on professional attire. See full list of discounted items.
Register on Handshake for updated UVA shuttle information.
 
 

Biotechnology Career Panel

Mon, 11/27/2017 - 12:30
Pinn Hall 1-14

Join the Biotechnology Ph.D Training Program for this years Biotechnology Career Panel. Refreshments will be served at 12:15pm with an hour informational session to follow.
 
 

Datapalooza 2017

Thu, 11/09/2017 - 15:00
Newcomb Hall Ballroom

Join the Datapoolza KICKOFF Talk Kickoff Talk with New York Times Chief Data Scientist Chris Wiggins on Thursday, November 9, 2017 by clicking here.
The talk will begin at 3pm on Thursday, Nov. 9 in the Newcomb Hall Ballroom on Grounds, with a reception to follow at 4:30pm.
 
On Friday, starting at 8am, you will kick off the rest of Datapoolza with featured speakers, presentaions, and more. Click here to see agenda and to register for this event.

Fall Convocation

Fri, 11/03/2017 - 11:00

Academic Job Search Series: Academic Interviewing

Thu, 09/28/2017 - 14:00
Newcomb Hall, Kaleidoscope Room

This workshop will provide an overview of the academic interviewing process and tips for how to be successful.  Time wil be reserved for participants to practice interviewing skills with peers and program participants.  
Click here to register

Academic Interviewing

Thu, 09/28/2017 - 10:00
Newcomb Hall, Kaleidoscope Room

Part of the Academic Job Search series.

2:00-4:00 pm

Register here

Academic Job Search Series: Reflective Teaching Statements

Thu, 09/21/2017 - 14:00
Newcomb Hall, Kaleidoscope Room

What is a reflective teaching statement and what makes one effective?  In this third part of the Academic Job Search Series, facilitators from the Center for Teaching Excellence will offer participants the opportunity to evaluate sample teaching statements from a variety of sources, to examine the conventions of teaching statements across disciplines, and to begin to articulate their own teaching philosophy.  
Register Here

Reflective Teaching Statements

Thu, 09/21/2017 - 10:00
Newcomb Hall, Kaleidoscope Room

Part of the Academic Job Search series.

2:00-4:00 pm

Register here

Academic Job Search Series: Academic Cover Letters

Thu, 09/14/2017 - 14:00
Newcomb Hall, Kaleidoscope Room

This workshop will offer guidelines and best practices for academic cover letters. Please come with one printed copy of your academic cover letter (rough drafts are fine - you're bringing it to get feedback!) AND one academic job advertisement.   
Click here to register

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